Guitar Glam

For those of you following me on Hometalk, you may have already seen this project.

My 18 year-old son recently got a new (adult) guitar.  He had outgrown his youth version several years ago and told me to go ahead and get rid of it.  I thought of selling it but then I got inspired….

I saw a post on the internet where a lady used napkins and Mod Podge to create a stunning piece of art.  I bought a few napkins and broke out my gallon jug of Mod Podge and then, like most women do, I changed my mind.  I loved the raised stencil so much that I decided to try it on the guitar.

I applied removed the guitar strings from the tuning pegs and put them in a ziplock bag to protect them.  Of course, I eventually completely removed the strings to make the stenciling a little easier.  Then I applied a coat of chalk paint.

I had recently purchased several sets of vintage sheet music for less than a dollar a piece and decided to use that to cover the sides.  Applied a coat of MP, applied the sheet music, allowed to dry a bit and add MP over the top.  (Once it is completely dry, I used sand paper to remove the overhang.)

After the Mod Podge dried and the edges smoothed, I began the task of stenciling using my plastic stencil and sheetrock mud.  I added it a little think and then lightly removed the excess, trying not to remove so much as to reveal the stencil underneath.  It just gives it more depth.

 

I allowed the first stencil to dry and then used the raised edges as a guide to place the stencil and completely cover the top of the body.

Once the mud is completely dry (overnight), I sanded and repainted with the antique white chalk paint.

I must admit that I went back an forth on how to get the detail to pop.  I wanted to have black detail to match the music notes on the sides but I just could not get it to work.  I initially painted the mud black (see below), repainted with chalk painted, and sanded down to the black paint but it just did not do what I wanted it to (not enough black came through – I think I sanded it away).

I have read other posts that use paint and texture power to create the raised stencil… that would’ve created a black accent when sanded but I had already purchased a gallon of sheetrock mud (super cheap) and I didn’t want the added expense of more paint and texture medium.

So I painted it again, sealed it with Polycrylic, and added an antiquing glaze.  I used Valspar Gazing medium mixed with a dark walnut stain.  Brushed it on liberally and wiped off with a baby wipe leaving a nice aged patina.

I added a simple ribbon at the top to hang it.

The perfect addition to any music room!

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Raised Stencil Technique

I recently discovered a beautiful technique to add depth and beauty to almost any piece of furniture and I just have to share it with you.  It is raised stencil.

Last year I purchased a sewing machine/cabinet at an auction for $3.  It weighed a ton and stayed in the garage for several months.  I finally decided the only way I could move the cabinet into the house by myself was to remove the machine.  Of course, I had always planned on removing the machine and up-cycling the cabinet but never seemed to get around to it.  So I finally bit the bullet one week while hubby was out of town and began the transformation.  The machine itself weighed nearly 40 pounds.  (yes, I weighed it… I just could not believe how heavy it was).

Once I got it into the house, I removed the legs and began painting.  I also removed the hinges and secured the top with a brad nailer.  I really wanted to make a drawer inside for storage but when you open the door, there is a plastic spool rack that cannot be removed (the legs are attached to it).

I knew the look I wanted but wasn’t sure how to achieve it.

After one coat of chalk paint, I added a stencil and went over it with Sheetrock mud.  When I lifted the stencil, I had a beautiful raised effect. (below left: applying the stencil to one side of the side of the cabinet; below right:  the door after applying the full stencil)

A few more coats of paint, a little sanding, and a couple coats of Polycrylic and I was ready to add some antiquing glaze.  I combined a dark oak stain with a glazing medium and applied over the raised stencil and rubbed it off to achieve the look I wanted.

Ta Da!  I must admit I am totally in love with this piece but it WILL go in the booth for sale.  I have another cabinet in my living room I will transform for myself (when I get the time).

Rainy Day Projects

Here in the south, we are not accustomed to being shut in often.  However, the month of January saw below average temperatures and dreary days.

I seized the opportunity to work on a few projects that I had been putting off.

Last year a good friend gave me a hutch she was going to trash.  It had been sitting in the garage for months so I finally decided to bring it in and turn it into a sewing and craft storage unit.

Befiore
During
After

The second project was a coffee table I picked up at an auction last year as a “freebie”.  I love it when you have your eye on something in particular and the auctioneer just keeps adding to the pile.  I get the goodies I want for a good price and a few freebies tossed in for good measure.  Some I can use, come I can’t.  I decided to chalk paint, stencil, and wax this piece.  However, I am pretty sad with the way the dark wax looks.  It just seems so splotchy to me and I am not sure how to even it out.  Maybe someone will fall in love with it and scarf it up.

 

Last but not least is an adorable suitcase makeover.  I have had this garage sale find for a few years.  It was originally blue so I kept it in  my living room with a few items displayed but I just didn’t have room in the new house.  I finally found the perfect inspiration online and used a couple of old pillow shame to create this lovely addition to any Victorian/Shabby Chic room, wedding, or shower.  This was also my first attempt at raised (3D) stenciling.

Farmhouse Sink Update

It has been awhile since I posted but I finally have a few minutes to give an update on the sink project.  We actually finished in early December so this is only about too months late.

I must confess that I am still trying to get used to a farm house sink.  It really isn’t at all what I expected.  It is hard for me to go from 2 basins to 1.  It really makes some things quite difficult.

As you can see from the photos, I have two options for the cabinet under the sink.  The hubby did a great job of adding the mini cabinet door and drawer on the left to help make the sink look more centered.  But I also like the look of the curtain underneath.  I think it fits in with the age of the house and ties everything together.  I just used a tension rod to hold it in place so it can be easily removed and tossed in the washer.

We added a white subway tile back splash with grey grout and a white hexagon mini tile counter top with grey diamond accents.  Then we painted the trim in a matching grey.

With Curtain
Without Curtain