Custom Pieces

Hi All!  Here are a few custom pieces I recently finished.  These items were either brought in to recover or they were ordered from items in stock.

Vintage Wicker Chest (this item is the only thing in this post I have for sale):

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AFTER

 

Antique Chair – Bird Chair (customer painted; I took it part and recovered):

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AFTER

Antique Vanity – makeover (featuring French stenciled top and drawer sides with raised stencil sides and drawer front).

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AFTER

 

AFTERChest of Drawers – reinforced drawer bottoms, painted, distressed, and new hardware

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Chair – full upholstery (this chair will be used as a companion piece for the “bird” chair above.  I cannot wait to see them together in the client’s home.

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Getting There!

Hi All!

Just a quick update to let you know we are up and running.  The store part of the shop is not really ready to open but I am cranking out custom furniture as fast as I can.

I am in the shop most weekdays after 4 PM and on weekends by appointment.

Here is the outside of the shop so far.  We still have to add some skirting and do a bit of landscaping but the 100 degree Louisiana summer is not the time of year to tackle landscaping.

Be sure to stop by and say hi!  You may just find that perfect accent for your home or a piece of furniture to me to customize for your space.

Baby Steps

Hi All!

I am so excited to announce that I have a shop!  Well, I have a building that I hope will  soon become a shop.

The portable building was delivered almost a month ago and the hubby and I have spent every spare minute adding electricity, insulation, walls, paint, etc.  We still have a little ways to go but we are well on our way.  I have moved several items in already and have 3 pieces I am working on for a client (the other 4 pieces I had to finish in my living room).

Hopefully we will finish the landscaping soon and I can open to the public one weekend a month and by appointment.

I am so excited to finally have a place to escape and use my passion for up-cycling.

I just hope everything fits!

Before…

During…

Moving in….

Progress on the NYH Shop

 

Guitar Glam

For those of you following me on Hometalk, you may have already seen this project.

My 18 year-old son recently got a new (adult) guitar.  He had outgrown his youth version several years ago and told me to go ahead and get rid of it.  I thought of selling it but then I got inspired….

I saw a post on the internet where a lady used napkins and Mod Podge to create a stunning piece of art.  I bought a few napkins and broke out my gallon jug of Mod Podge and then, like most women do, I changed my mind.  I loved the raised stencil so much that I decided to try it on the guitar.

I applied removed the guitar strings from the tuning pegs and put them in a ziplock bag to protect them.  Of course, I eventually completely removed the strings to make the stenciling a little easier.  Then I applied a coat of chalk paint.

I had recently purchased several sets of vintage sheet music for less than a dollar a piece and decided to use that to cover the sides.  Applied a coat of MP, applied the sheet music, allowed to dry a bit and add MP over the top.  (Once it is completely dry, I used sand paper to remove the overhang.)

After the Mod Podge dried and the edges smoothed, I began the task of stenciling using my plastic stencil and sheetrock mud.  I added it a little think and then lightly removed the excess, trying not to remove so much as to reveal the stencil underneath.  It just gives it more depth.

 

I allowed the first stencil to dry and then used the raised edges as a guide to place the stencil and completely cover the top of the body.

Once the mud is completely dry (overnight), I sanded and repainted with the antique white chalk paint.

I must admit that I went back an forth on how to get the detail to pop.  I wanted to have black detail to match the music notes on the sides but I just could not get it to work.  I initially painted the mud black (see below), repainted with chalk painted, and sanded down to the black paint but it just did not do what I wanted it to (not enough black came through – I think I sanded it away).

I have read other posts that use paint and texture power to create the raised stencil… that would’ve created a black accent when sanded but I had already purchased a gallon of sheetrock mud (super cheap) and I didn’t want the added expense of more paint and texture medium.

So I painted it again, sealed it with Polycrylic, and added an antiquing glaze.  I used Valspar Gazing medium mixed with a dark walnut stain.  Brushed it on liberally and wiped off with a baby wipe leaving a nice aged patina.

I added a simple ribbon at the top to hang it.

The perfect addition to any music room!

Raised Stencil Technique

I recently discovered a beautiful technique to add depth and beauty to almost any piece of furniture and I just have to share it with you.  It is raised stencil.

Last year I purchased a sewing machine/cabinet at an auction for $3.  It weighed a ton and stayed in the garage for several months.  I finally decided the only way I could move the cabinet into the house by myself was to remove the machine.  Of course, I had always planned on removing the machine and up-cycling the cabinet but never seemed to get around to it.  So I finally bit the bullet one week while hubby was out of town and began the transformation.  The machine itself weighed nearly 40 pounds.  (yes, I weighed it… I just could not believe how heavy it was).

Once I got it into the house, I removed the legs and began painting.  I also removed the hinges and secured the top with a brad nailer.  I really wanted to make a drawer inside for storage but when you open the door, there is a plastic spool rack that cannot be removed (the legs are attached to it).

I knew the look I wanted but wasn’t sure how to achieve it.

After one coat of chalk paint, I added a stencil and went over it with Sheetrock mud.  When I lifted the stencil, I had a beautiful raised effect. (below left: applying the stencil to one side of the side of the cabinet; below right:  the door after applying the full stencil)

A few more coats of paint, a little sanding, and a couple coats of Polycrylic and I was ready to add some antiquing glaze.  I combined a dark oak stain with a glazing medium and applied over the raised stencil and rubbed it off to achieve the look I wanted.

Ta Da!  I must admit I am totally in love with this piece but it WILL go in the booth for sale.  I have another cabinet in my living room I will transform for myself (when I get the time).

Lace Tabletop

I scored this cute little table at an auction.  At first glance it looked perfect so I was excited to get it for such a steal.

However, once we got it home we discovered it had a small nail-hole in the top.  My husband removed the nails and noticed the piece was engineered in such a way that the legs would just slip into slots and become extremely sturdy without the need of fasteners of any kind.

After he put the table back together, I had the (more) difficult task of choosing a paint color.  I opted for a blue-green chalk paint (I added Plaster of Paris and water to make my own).  Although, I was happy with the color, something was missing… AND there was still a hole in the top.  So I dug through my stash of linens and found an old tattered lace table cloth.

I placed the tablecloth on the table, centering the design as much as possible and spray painted it with white paint.  Using a smaller cloth I repeated the process on the lower level of the table.  After the paint was dry, I sanded, lightly distressed, and waxed the entire piece.  This technique helps to hide the small hole as it just blends in with the rest of the distressed look.

I hope you like the outcome as much as I do.

 

Scuttle?

I have to admit, I had no idea what a scuttle was… that is, until I ran across the cutest one EVER on Etsy.  I was looking for a vintage shaving mug for my husband’s bathroom and saw several items listed as “scuttle”.  There were several available for purchase but only one in my price range so I immediately scarfed it up.  I was unsure of the purchase at first but am glad to report I am totally thrilled with what I received.

Of course this is NOT going in my husband’s bathroom.  It will go in mine.  (I settled on a vintage Old Spice mug for him.)

Of course, I am not sure exactly who used the scuttle before as it seems that most were geared toward men’s shaving needs.  However, I cannot imagine MY petite, feminine scuttle being used by a big, strong, hairy man… but hey, I could be wrong.

A shaving scuttle is a small pitcher-like cup that hold hot water on the bottom, has a spout/brush holder, and a place on top for a round bar of shaving soap (with holes for drainage).

Here is the photo from the Etsy shop.  I will post a one later in my bathroom (see below)

My little friend on display in the bathroom.  Yes, the bathroom is tiny… you have to remember, it is over 80 years old.

On a side note:  I HATE my bathroom floor!  It is the same as the kitchen.  I am not sure what it is made of but it was installed just before we purchased the home.  I just can’t seem to get it clean.  It is almost like it is porous; it grabs dirt and grime and will not let go.  haha

Flea Market Finds and Garage Sale Goodies

Greetings all!  Please accept my apology for not updating in such a long, long time.  I am hoping to stay on top of this from now on.  Not that I have a lot of followers but I really feel like I need a place to store all of the projects I complete and goodies I find.

First, I want to showcase a few items I recently found for Nana’s Yellow House.  I am always looking for vintage items from the 30’s and 40’s to add character to our home.  Being on a budget only allows for smaller items but I think they really add that special touch.

Here are a just a few of the cool items I found lately…..

 

 

 

 

A Couch to Swoon For!

via Daily Prompt: Paint

A few months ago I found this swan fainting couch for a mere $20.  I loved the fact that it was a fainting sofa and that it was so inexpensive so I jumped at the chance to make it something more.

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It had some damage; an angry cat and a wobbly let but, all-in-all, it was sturdy and fixable.

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We started by taking the entire piece apart.  We always work carefully and take a lot of pictures so we will know how it goes back together.

My initial hope was to strip the finish and bring out the natural wood and reupholster with a light colored fabric.  However, when we tried to strip the finish it was nearly impenetrable.

We tried several techniques and products but eventually gave up.  The wood under the finished was very usual and would not take stain well so we stopped working in the couch and started some other projects.

Finally, after a few months of research, I decided to go ahead and paint the couch.  I am not a fan of painting furniture but this had to be an exception as the wood was nothing that would take a stain or could even be treated to preserve the natural look.  (I am thinking it is made of Poplar).

I started by cleaning out all of the little nooks and crannies and wiping down to remove any dust and grime.  Next, I primed each piece with Kilz.

Once I added a couple of coats of paint, it was time I took the piece inside so I could add the finishing touches.  Even though it may seem less practical, I like to do the detail work in my house.  My shop tends to be dusty and I hated to risk messing up the white finish.

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I decided to go with an antiquing glaze instead of distressing by sanding (not a fan as it tends to damage the wood).

This was my first large project with the glaze and I was very pleased.  Just look at the detail!

Next, it was time to add the seating.  Since the original board under the foam was broken, we chose to cut a new piece of plywood for a nice sturdy seat.

We were able to reuse most of the original foam.  I used the original fabric for a pattern and began the task of rebuilding.

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It took some time and much “discussion” over the correct way to add the seating but we finally agreed to disagree and did the best we could.

I have a few more staples to add and the trim but it looks like it will be a beautiful piece.

TA DA!!!!  Finally Finished!  (now to get it sold)

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Nana’s Yellow Table

It must be something about owning a yellow house.  Everything yellow seems to catch my eye.

When I found this table in my mother’s house after she passed away I thought it was too cute to throw out so I decided to take it home and show it some love.

I started by taking it completely apart and sanding it down.  Some of the dowel rods with missing in the rack so I had to purchase and cut new ones to fill in the gaps.

Then I applied 2 coats of white paint and put it back together.

 

Once the table was back together, I had to start working on the top.  There was a hole in the top where a lamp was once attached so I to seal the hole with wood filler and paint over it.

A few months ago I ran across a table online that had been tiled using old broken china.  I loved the look and set our to find the perfect pink plates to do something similar.  However, I never was able to find the right plates for the job; or to complete the look I had in my head.

While garage sale shopping with my girlfriend, I stumbled upon a set of 10 plates for $3.  I initially passed them up but finally decided I could not pass up a $3 deal… surely, I would find SOMETHING  to do with 10 daisy plates.

Eventually I got impatient and decided to forgo the pink table top and opted to use the yellow daisy plates for my little magazine table.

 

I carefully cut each piece and laid it out on my work space so the pattern would line up.  After I was sure I had enough tiles cut, I placed them on the table top to see exactly how I wanted it to look.  (please be sure to wear gloves and safety glasses)

Once I had it all laid out like I wanted it, I used tile adhesive to attach each piece to the table top.  You can do this a couple of ways:  you can spread the adhesive on the full table using a tile trowel or you and do like I did and put the adhesive on each individual piece and lay them one at a time.

The reason I chose to do it that was is because all of the pieces were different widths and shapes and it was nearly impossible to get them even.

I let the adhesive dry overnight and added non-sanded grout the next day and let that dry overnight.  The next day, I sealed the grout with grout sealer.

I had initially thought about leaving the table while but the yellow daisies seem to get lost in the white table so I decided to paint the table yellow and add a light brown glaze to bring out the golden brown tones of the daisy petals.

Finally, it was time to add a coat of poly.  I always try to use poly just to add extra durability.  The last thing you want it for your paint to chip away.

Table after

I am very happy with the way it turned out.