Guitar Glam

For those of you following me on Hometalk, you may have already seen this project.

My 18 year-old son recently got a new (adult) guitar.  He had outgrown his youth version several years ago and told me to go ahead and get rid of it.  I thought of selling it but then I got inspired….

I saw a post on the internet where a lady used napkins and Mod Podge to create a stunning piece of art.  I bought a few napkins and broke out my gallon jug of Mod Podge and then, like most women do, I changed my mind.  I loved the raised stencil so much that I decided to try it on the guitar.

I applied removed the guitar strings from the tuning pegs and put them in a ziplock bag to protect them.  Of course, I eventually completely removed the strings to make the stenciling a little easier.  Then I applied a coat of chalk paint.

I had recently purchased several sets of vintage sheet music for less than a dollar a piece and decided to use that to cover the sides.  Applied a coat of MP, applied the sheet music, allowed to dry a bit and add MP over the top.  (Once it is completely dry, I used sand paper to remove the overhang.)

After the Mod Podge dried and the edges smoothed, I began the task of stenciling using my plastic stencil and sheetrock mud.  I added it a little think and then lightly removed the excess, trying not to remove so much as to reveal the stencil underneath.  It just gives it more depth.

 

I allowed the first stencil to dry and then used the raised edges as a guide to place the stencil and completely cover the top of the body.

Once the mud is completely dry (overnight), I sanded and repainted with the antique white chalk paint.

I must admit that I went back an forth on how to get the detail to pop.  I wanted to have black detail to match the music notes on the sides but I just could not get it to work.  I initially painted the mud black (see below), repainted with chalk painted, and sanded down to the black paint but it just did not do what I wanted it to (not enough black came through – I think I sanded it away).

I have read other posts that use paint and texture power to create the raised stencil… that would’ve created a black accent when sanded but I had already purchased a gallon of sheetrock mud (super cheap) and I didn’t want the added expense of more paint and texture medium.

So I painted it again, sealed it with Polycrylic, and added an antiquing glaze.  I used Valspar Gazing medium mixed with a dark walnut stain.  Brushed it on liberally and wiped off with a baby wipe leaving a nice aged patina.

I added a simple ribbon at the top to hang it.

The perfect addition to any music room!

Advertisements

Raised Stencil Technique

I recently discovered a beautiful technique to add depth and beauty to almost any piece of furniture and I just have to share it with you.  It is raised stencil.

Last year I purchased a sewing machine/cabinet at an auction for $3.  It weighed a ton and stayed in the garage for several months.  I finally decided the only way I could move the cabinet into the house by myself was to remove the machine.  Of course, I had always planned on removing the machine and up-cycling the cabinet but never seemed to get around to it.  So I finally bit the bullet one week while hubby was out of town and began the transformation.  The machine itself weighed nearly 40 pounds.  (yes, I weighed it… I just could not believe how heavy it was).

Once I got it into the house, I removed the legs and began painting.  I also removed the hinges and secured the top with a brad nailer.  I really wanted to make a drawer inside for storage but when you open the door, there is a plastic spool rack that cannot be removed (the legs are attached to it).

I knew the look I wanted but wasn’t sure how to achieve it.

After one coat of chalk paint, I added a stencil and went over it with Sheetrock mud.  When I lifted the stencil, I had a beautiful raised effect. (below left: applying the stencil to one side of the side of the cabinet; below right:  the door after applying the full stencil)

A few more coats of paint, a little sanding, and a couple coats of Polycrylic and I was ready to add some antiquing glaze.  I combined a dark oak stain with a glazing medium and applied over the raised stencil and rubbed it off to achieve the look I wanted.

Ta Da!  I must admit I am totally in love with this piece but it WILL go in the booth for sale.  I have another cabinet in my living room I will transform for myself (when I get the time).